Coulton’s 1200 km drive to work, Broken Hill office open - NSW Nationals

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Coulton’s 1200 km drive to work, Broken Hill office open

Few people can say they drive 1200 kilometres to work.

After opening up an electorate office in Broken Hill on Friday, Member for Parkes Mark Coulton is one of them.

The Nationals MP is spending more time in Broken Hill after his electorate was expanded to cover 48 per cent of the state’s landmass ahead of the 2016 election.

"It’s about 12 hours [from his home in Warialda] and from Dubbo I think it’s about eight,” Mr Coutlon said.

“That’s why we need to have one out here because after Dubbo it’s the second-biggest city in the electorate.”

The people of Broken Hill also had a lot of different concerns, he said.

“Because it’s a mining city and they orient back towards South Australia it’s very different to other parts of the electorate,” Mr Coulton said.

“The biggest issue out here is water and the management of the Menindee Lakes.

“The people of Broken Hill have a wonderful connection to the Menindee Lakes because it’s good for recreation and at the moment it’s their water supply.”

Mr Coulton said he could still effectively serve the people of Dubbo, but would have to spend more time on the road.

“It makes it interesting to coordinate all of that but I’ve got good staff … I’m looking forward to being the member for western NSW.”

 

Full story: http://www.dailyliberal.com.au/story/4539113/coultons-1200-km-drive-to-work/

** Article and image sourced from Daily Liberal, 27 March 2017.

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